Preclinical Data

Effects of a Self-Assembling Peptide on Second Degree Burn Progression and Healing in a Porcine Model

Authors: Alexander Higa, Joel Gil, Michael Solis, Colin Simms and Stephen C. Davis (Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL)

Presented at SAWC Fall Virtual 2020 in November 2020

Conclusion: Overall, SAPH1 treated wounds showed a reduction in thermal damage, as well an increase in the re-epithelialization rate. Interestingly, a lower total bacterial count was also seen with SAPH treatment. These preliminary results suggest that SAPH may have healing benefits when treating second degree burn wounds, however additional studies are needed to substantiate these findings.

1 AC5 Advanced Wound System in the USA; AC5 Topical Hemostat in the EU.

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Effects of a Self-Assembling Peptide on Full-Thickness Wound Healing in a Porcine Model

Joel Gil, Michael Solis, Alexander Higa, Colin Simms, Jie Li and Stephen Davis (Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology & Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL)

Presented at SAWC Fall Virtual 2020 in November 2020

Conclusion: SAPH2 exhibited an increase in epithelialization and granulation tissue formation on day 8 as compared to all other treatment groups. SAPH was the only treatment application reaching full re-epithelialization by day 11. Wounds treated with Skin Substitute had lower granulation tissue formation on day 6 as compared to the other treatment groups. SAPH appears to be a promising easy to apply treatment for enhancing wound healing; additional studies are needed to validate these findings.

2 AC5 Advanced Wound System in the USA; AC5 Topical Hemostat in the EU.

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Arch Therapeutics’ AC5 Self-Assembling Peptide Mechanism of Action

Arch’s initial products to market will be in the AC5® family. AC5® is a self-assembling peptide (SAP) comprising naturally-occurring amino acids. The technology has shown promise in various barrier applications for hemostatic effect, control of substance movement, and prevention of adhesions, as well as in nerve and other tissue regeneration, where the nanoscale scaffold-like structure of the barrier provides a microenvironment that allows normal wound healing

When applied onto a wound, AC5® rapidly intercalates into the nooks and crannies of the tissue as it builds itself into a physical, mechanical wound-filling structure.


SAP (A) contacts wound’s ionic charge (B) and assembles into a nanofiber network (C) that gels while it fills the wound  (D) * = areas of intercalation) into connective tissue forming mechanical-physical barrier to fluids, bacteria, etc., 

Arch Therapeutics' proprietary AC5 self-assembling peptide technology has been demonstrated to provide hemostasis and act as a sealant while enabling normal healing in preclinical animal studies in a range of tissues, such as liver, skin, muscle, brain, eye, spine, spleen, arteries, veins, stomach and bowel). 

Assessment of Arch’s AC5 Self-Assembling Peptide Technology in a Rodent Liver Hemostasis Biosurgical Model

  • Worked equally well in presence of heparin.


Assessment of Arch’s AC5 Self-Assembling Peptide Technology versus Competing Products in a Rodent Liver Hemostasis and Adhesion Biosurgical Model

  • AC5 hemostasis and adhesion profile was superior.


Hemostatic Effect in Ocular Application

Sclera of a rat eye (A) is punctured with a syringe at the limbal artery (B) and bleeds profusely (C). The eye is then treated with SAP (D). Bleeding stopped in 8 seconds and remained stopped for the duration of the observation (15 minutes). Pressure applied to the cornea did not dislodge the material from the sclera (F). Hemostasis was maintained even with repeated manipulation of the eye. Ellis-Behnke R, Liang Y-X, You SW, et al. PNAS 2006;1033:5054–9. Data on file, Arch Therapeutics.